https://www.khaleejtimes.com/technology/robots-will-soon-be-found-in-dubai-classrooms

Robotics

When teachers introduce robotics into the classroom they are providing students with opportunities for hands-on engagement with their learning (Chandra, 2011). Robotics draws on constructivist pedagogy, whereby students’ knowledge is developed in accordance with their experiences (Chandra, 2011), and students’ experiences with robots enhance their creativity. 

Chandra (2011) suggests that the integration of robotics engages students in developed critical twenty first century skills, such as problem solving and creative thinking. Robotics allows students to solve challenges from abstract to tangible, ultimately simplifying problem solving (Chandra, 2011). 

 

Chandra (2011) suggests that the integration of robotics engages students in developed critical twenty first century skills, such as problem solving and creative thinking. Robotics allows students to solve challenges from abstract to tangible, ultimately simplifying problem solving (Chandra, 2011). 

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Robotics can also act as a model or tangible artefact when teaching abstract concepts (Chandra, 2011), specifically in mathematics, science and technology (Scardozi, Sorbi, Pedale Valzano & Cinzia (2015). Moreover, Burrett (2015) suggests that robotics align with the Australian Curriculum focus on inquiry skills, by engaging students in student-driven and centred learning. Chandra and Vinesh (2014) further suggest the significance of robotics on students’ literacy skills, positing that these develop through oral communication with peers, print literacy as students learn, and digital literacies. 

An obvious benefit of robotics in the classroom is increasing student engagement (Baxter, Ashurst, Read, Kennedy & Belpaeme, 2017). Chandra (2011) suggests that students engagement and motivation are enhanced with the introduction of robotics. Moreover, Chandra, Vinesh (2014) suggest that robotics activities in class encourage teamwork and collaborative learning. Through this process students are able to gain new perspectives, which allows for the fostering of creativity (Chandra & Vinesh, 2014).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MLKyBXUfTHQ

An example of Robotics use in the primary classroom includes the use of Dash and Dot, two robots made specifically for children. By utilising Dash and Dot in the classroom, students not only engage in coding skills, but also young students can develop their fine motor skills, by drawing the pathways for the robots to follow. This could be done when teaching students the letters and requiring students to draw the letters on the iPad for Dash and Dot to execute.

Here are some other Robotics experiences we had in class.

 

 

References:

Baxter, P., Ashurst, E., Read, R., Kennedy, J., & Belpaeme, T. (2017). Robot Education Peers in a Situated Primary School Study: Personalisation Promotes Child Learning. PLOS ONE, 12(5).

Burrett, K. (2015) Robotics and coding; Inspiring future learning. Scan, 34(4), 33-38.

Chandra, V. (2014). Developing students’ technological literacy through robotics activities. Literacy Learning: The Middle Years, 22(3), 24-29.

Chandra, V. (2011). Integrating Robotics in Primary School Activities. Professional Magazine, 26, 1328-9780.

Scardozzi, D., Sorbi, L., Pedale, A., Valzano, M., & Vergine, C. (2015). Teaching robotics at the primary school: An innovative approach. Procedia – Social and Behavioural Sciences, 174, 3838-3846.

Wonder Workshop. (2014). Wonder Workshop – Robots helping kids learn to code. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MLKyBXUfTHQ

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